[Skip to Content]

1040 Tax Calculator

Enter your filing status, income, deductions and credits and we will estimate your total taxes. Based on your projected tax withholding for the year, we can also estimate your tax refund or amount you may owe the IRS next April.

1040 Tax Calculator Definitions

Federal Income Tax Rates:
**TAXTABLE_TAXYEAR_DEFINITION**
Filing status
Choose your filing status. Your filing status determines the income levels for your Federal tax rates. It is also used to determine your standard deduction, personal exemptions, and many deduction or credit phaseout income ranges. The table below summarizes the five possible filing status choices. It is important to understand that your marital status as of the last day of the year determines your filing status.

Filing Status
Married Filing Jointly If you are married, you are able to file a joint return with your spouse. If your spouse died during the tax year, you are still able to file a joint return for that year. You may also choose to file separately under the status "Married Filing Separately".
Qualified Widow(er) Generally, you qualify for this status for two years after the year of your spouse's death, as long as you and your spouse filed a joint tax return in the year immediately prior to their death. You are also required to have at least one dependent child or stepchild for whom you are the primary provider.
Single If you are divorced, legally separated or unmarried as of the last day of the year you should use this status.
Head of Household This is the status for unmarried individuals that pay for more than half of the cost to keep up a home. This home needs to be the main home for the income tax filer and at least one qualifying relative. You can also choose this status if you are married, but didn't live with your spouse at any time during the last six months of the year. You also need to provide more than half of the cost to keep up your home and have at least one dependent child living with you.
Married Filing Separately If you are married, you have the choice to file separate returns. The filing status for this option is "Married Filing Separately".
Personal exemption
Check this box to indicate you qualify for a personal exemption. Your person exemption reduces your taxable income by $4,050 for 2017. If you can be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return, you can't claim a personal exemption for yourself.
Spousal exemption
Check this box to indicate your spouse qualifies for a spousal exemption. Your spousal exemption reduces your taxable income by $4,050 for 2017. This option is only available if you have a filing status of Married Filing Jointly. If your spouse can be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return, you can't claim a spousal exemption on your tax return.
Dependents
A dependent is someone you support and for whom you can claim a dependency exemption. In 2017, each dependent you claim entitles you to receive a $4,050 reduction in your taxable income (see exemptions below). You may also receive a tax credit of up to $1,000 for each dependent child under the age of 17. The credit is, however, phased out for at higher incomes.
Dependents qualifying for child tax credit
Enter the number of dependent children that qualify for the child tax credit. To qualify a child must be under age 17 at the end of the year. They must be either your child, one of your siblings or your foster child or a child of any of them (for example your grandchild). In addition, they must have lived with you for more than half of the year, not provide more than half of their own support and must be claimed as a dependent on your tax return.
Wages, salaries, tips, etc.
Enter your total of all wages, salaries, tips, etc. For this entry only enter the amount for the primary taxpayer, do not include your spouse. This is normally the amount shown on your W-2 form(s) in box 1 provided by your employer. You should also include any wages received as a household employee not reported on a W-2 (a W-2 may not have been provided if the amount was less than $2,000). It should also include any tips not reported to your employer - including allocated tips that appear on your W-2 form(s) box 8.
Spouse wages, salaries, tips, etc.
Enter your spouse's total of all wages, salaries, tips, etc. For this entry, only enter the amount for your spouse. This is normally the amount shown on your spouse's W-2 form(s) in box 1 provided by your spouse's employer. You should also include any wages received as a household employee not reported on a W-2 (a W-2 may not have been provided if the amount was less than $2,000). It should also include any tips not reported to your spouse's employer - including allocated tips that appear on your spouse's W-2 form(s) box 8.
Taxable interest
Enter your total taxable interest. This should also include your spouse's taxable interest if you are married filing jointly. This is normally reported to you either form 1099-INT or form 1099-OID.
Tax-exempt interest
This amount is only used to calculate taxable Social Security Benefits and Earned Income credit. If these are not part of your return, this entry will not change your results. Enter your (and your spouse's if married filing jointly) total tax-exempt interest reported to you (and your spouse if you are married filing jointly) on form 1099-INT or form 1099-OID. Also include any amounts on 1099-DIV reported as exempt interest dividends. Don't include any interest earned in an IRA, Health Savings Account, MSA or Coverdell education savings account.
Ordinary dividends (this includes any qualified dividends)
Enter your (and your spouse's if married filing jointly) total dividends for the year. This amount is normally reported to you on form 1099-DIV. Note that your total ordinary dividends for the year will include as part of the total any qualified dividends received.
Qualified dividends
Enter your (and your spouse's if married filing jointly) total qualified dividends for the year. This amount is normally reported to you on form 1099-DIV. Qualified dividends are the portion of your total ordinary dividends subject to the lower capital gains tax rate. Qualified dividends are typically dividends paid by a corporation in which you own stock (or a mutual fund that owns stock in the corporation).

Qualified dividends also have a minimum holding period of the underlying stock. For common stock dividends to be considered qualified dividends, you need to have owned the stock for at least 60 days during a 121 day period that starts 60 days before the ex-dividend date. The same rule applies for preferred stock but the holding period is 90 days during a 181-day period starting 90 days before the ex-dividend date.

Stock you own directly, not through a mutual fund or exchange traded fund, will report qualified dividends without regard to your holding period. If you bought or sold the stock during the year, you will need to determine if your ownership of the underlying stock meets the holding requirement.

Mutual funds and exchange traded funds will report qualified dividends with regard to their holding period of a stock owned by the fund. However, if you bought or sold fund shares during the year you will need to apply the same holding requirements to fund shares you own (or owned) as you would to a common stock. If you do not meet the holding requirement, qualified dividends reported to you by your fund should not be included as qualified dividends on your tax return.

Taxable refunds of state and local income taxes
If you did not itemize your deductions in the previous year, or you itemized deductions but elected to include sales taxes (instead of income taxes) this amount will be $0 regardless of any refund you received. Otherwise, the amount of your refund is taxable to the extent in which the over payment decreased your taxable income in previous year.
Alimony received
Enter the amount you received as spousal maintenance or alimony.
Business income or loss (Schedule C & E subject to self-employment taxes)
Any income or loss as reported on Schedule C. If you have any income reported on Schedule E that is subject to self-employment taxes (such as from some Partnerships), that income should be entered here as well.
Spouse business income or loss (Schedule C & E subject to self-employment taxes)
Any income or loss as reported on a spouse's Schedule C. If your spouse has any income reported on a Schedule E that is subject to self-employment taxes (such as from some Partnerships), that income should be entered here as well.
Short-term capital gain or loss
This is the total capital gain you realized from the sale of assets held less than one year. Any amount you enter as a short-term capital gain is taxed as normal income.
Long-term capital gain or loss
This is the total capital gain you realized from the sale of assets held one year or longer. Any amount you enter as a long-term gain is taxed using the following rules:
  • 0% if your ordinary income marginal tax rate is 10% or 15%
  • 15% if your ordinary income marginal tax rate is greater than 15% and less than 39.6%
  • 20% if your ordinary income marginal tax rate is 39.6%
  • This calculator assumes that none of your long-term capital gains come from collectibles, section 1202 gains or un-recaptured 1250 gains. These types of capital gains are taxed at 28%, 28% and 25% respectively (unless your ordinary income tax bracket is a lower rate).
Other gains or losses
Other gains or losses not reported elsewhere. If you sold or exchanged assets used in a trade or business you may need to use form 4797. Gain or Loss reported on form 4797 is usually reported as part of the business on schedule C or Schedule D and not as an "other gain or loss".
Taxable IRA distributions
Enter any IRA distributions that are taxable. This would normally include distributions from a Traditional IRA, simplified employee pension (SEP) IRA, or a SIMPLE IRA. This also includes conversions of any of these IRA accounts to a ROTH IRA. If in previous years you made any contributions to your Traditional, SEP, or SIMPLE IRA that were not tax-deductible, some of your distribution may not be subject to tax. See form 8606 and its instructions for tax treatment in any of these situations.

Do not include any SEP, SIMPLE or Traditional IRA distributions that were rolled over to a Traditional IRA account. Do not include Roth to Roth rollovers or qualified ROTH IRA distributions.

Taxable pensions and annuity distributions
This is the taxable portion of payment made by a pension or an annuity. This also includes distributions from Traditional 401(k), 403(b) and governmental 457(b) plans. Generally speaking, if you did not pay for an annuity or pension yourself, or if all contributions were made with pre-tax money, then all distributions will be fully taxable. If you purchased an annuity with after-tax money (for example from your personal savings NOT a retirement account), distributions from the annuity will have the taxable portion reduced by the amount paid for the annuity. This reduction in taxability is spread out over the remaining projected lifetime of the annuity owner. See 1040 instruct.
Intangible drilling costs (IDC) for investor general partners (this is an income reduction)
Oil and gas investment, when done as a general partner, can have intangible drilling costs that are considered an immediate loss of capital. This type of income reduction is both complex in its form and requirements. Please consult the IRS Oil and Gas Handbook for more information.
Income from rentals, royalties, S Corporations and Schedule E (not already included and subject to NIIT)
This type of investment income is subject to the 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT). Any income already reported on another line should not be included here. Generally speaking this is income from any businesses that are passive activities to the taxpayer, and not reported elsewhere (for example, do not include income subject to self-employment taxes). This could include income from rental real estate, royalties, partnerships, S corporations, trusts, etc. There are exceptions and additional rules that can impact whether a particular business or investment income is subject to the NIIT. Please contact your tax professional for additional information.
Income from rentals, royalties, S Corporations and Schedule E (not already included and not subject to NIIT)
This is all income from any businesses that are NOT passive activities to the taxpayer, where the taxpayer materially participates, and not reported elsewhere (for example, do not include income subject to self-employment taxes). This amount is not subject to the 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT). This could include income from rental real estate, partnerships or S corporations where the income is considered non-passive. There are exceptions and additional rules that can impact whether a particular business or other investment income is subject to the NIIT. Please contact your tax professional for additional information.
Farm income or loss (Schedule F)
Farm income or loss (losses are entered as a negative number). Farm income is subject to self-employment taxes, which are automatically calculated.
Total unemployment compensation
Enter any unemployment compensation you (and your spouse if you are married filing jointly) received during the year.
Social Security benefits received
This is the total of all Social Security and equivalent Railroad Retirement benefits you and your spouse (if you are married filing jointly) received in 2017. These benefits are reported to you on forms SSA-1099 for Social Security and RRB-1099 for Railroad Retirement benefits.
Taxable income adjustments for Social Security, student loan interest & student tuition
This is for a group of income items and benefits normally excluded from your taxable income but included when calculating any of the following: 1) The amount of Social Security that taxable, 2) Phaseout of student loan interest deduction and 3) Phase out of tuition and fees deduction. This amount is the total of the following:
  1. Employer-provided adoption benefits excluded from your income (form 8839)
  2. Foreign earned income or housing that was excluded from your income (form 2555)
  3. Any exclusion of income for Bona Fide Residents of American Samoa (form 4563) or Puerto Rico.
Taxable Social Security benefits
A portion of your Social Security benefits and equivalent Railroad Retirement benefits are included in your Total Income (and subject to income taxes and any other tax rules that are based on your total income) when your income exceeds certain thresholds. Note that we don't include the impact of a lump-sum election for payments received for prior year's benefits in this calculation. An overview of the calculation (the detailed worksheet is part of IRS Publication 915) is described below.
  1. Calculate modified total income (MTI): Total Income (without Social Security Benefits) + 50% of your total Social Security benefits + Taxable Social Security income adjustments (Employer-provided Adoption benefits excluded from your income, Foreign earned income or housing excluded from your income, income for bona fide residents of American Samoa (form 4563) or Puerto Rico) + Tax exempt interest.

  2. Calculate modified total adjustments (MTA): Total adjustments minus any amounts for student loan interest deduction, tuition and fees deduction and domestic production activities deduction.

  3. Calculate modified adjusted gross income (MAGI): MTI- MTA

  4. If MAGI is less than the 'Base Amount' for your filing status, none of your Social Security benefit is included in your income.

  5. If MAGI is greater than the 'Base Amount' for your filing status, The Taxable Social Security benefit added to your Total Income is the sum of the following two calculations:
    • For each $1 of MAGI over the 'Base Amount' for your filing status $0.50 is Taxable. This total is limited by 1) 50% of your Social Security benefits or 2) 1/2 of the '50% Phaseout' whichever is less.

    • For each $1 of MAGI over the 'Base Amount'+'50% Phaseout' for your filing status $0.85 is Taxable.

  6. Taxable Social Security income is limited to 85% of your Social Security benefits.
Filing Status and Taxable Social Security Benefits
Filing StatusBase Amount50% Phaseout
Married Filing Jointly $32,000 $12,000
Qualified Widow(er) $25,000 $9,000
Single $25,000 $9,000
Head of Household $25,000 $9,000
Married Filing Separately* $0 $0
*If you are married and filed separately and lived apart from your spouse for the entire year, you may be able to use the single income thresholds. You may need to contact a tax professional to determine if you qualify.
Other income
Any other income you received during the year. This includes income reported to you on 1099-MISC that was already reported elsewhere.
Total income
Total income is calculated by adding lines 7 through 21 on your form 1040. For most taxpayers this includes wages, salaries, tips, interest, dividends and gains and losses from a variety of activities.
Educator expenses
If you were an 'eligible educator' in 2017 you are able to deduct up to $250 in expenses. If you are married filing jointly and both of you are 'eligible educators' the limit is $500 ($250 each). Eligible educators include kindergarten through 12th grade teachers, instructors, counselors, principals, or aides who worked in a school for at least 900 hours during the school year. The expenses can be for professional development courses related to what you teach or supplies you use in the classroom. Home schooling expenses do not qualify and nor do expenses that were reimbursed. Your total expenses must be reduced by any savings bond interest that was nontaxable for higher education expenses, nontaxable qualified tuition program earnings or distributions, and nontaxable distributions of Coverdell education savings account earnings.
Certain employee business expenses (form 2106 Employee Business Expenses)
This income deduction only applies to employee business expenses of reservists, qualified performing artists and fee-basis government officials. This includes non-reimbursed business expenses for vehicles, parking fees, tolls, transportation, lodging and other business expenses. Meals and entertainment are included but limited to 50% of the expense incurred.
Health Savings Account (HSA) deduction (form 8889)
Enter your Health Savings Account (HSA) contributions for 2017. The maximum contribution is $3,400 for single coverage and $6,750 for family coverage. To qualify for the deduction, you must have had a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) and contributed to your HSA account. Amounts contributed by your employer are not deductible. See form 8889 for more information.
Moving expenses (form 3903)
If you moved to a new home due to a new principal workplace, you may be able to deduct non-reimbursed moving expenses. To qualify, your new workplace must be at least 50 miles farther from your old home than from your new home. You also need to work in the new workplace (or general area) for at least 39 weeks during the next 12 months (78 weeks over 24 months for the self-employed). There are exceptions for members of the Armed Forces, jobs ending from disability and other employment changes. See form 3903 for more information.
One-half of self-employment tax (Schedule SE)
This amount is calculated for you. It is one-half (50%) of your total self-employment tax. Please see 'Self-Employment' tax for details on how this is calculated.
Self-employed SEP, SIMPLE and qualified plans
If you are self-employed and made contributions to retirement plan such as a SEP, SIMPLE or other qualified plan enter that amount here. For more information about these plans and contribution rules see publication 560.
Self-employed health insurance deduction
Your health insurance premiums can be deducted from your taxable income if you are self-employed with net self-employment income, a partner with net earnings from self-employment, or received wages from an S corporation that you owned more than 2%. Note that for S corporations you can only deduct the premiums if they are reported as wages on your W-2.
Penalty on early withdrawal of savings
Enter any amounts from form 1099-INT or form 1099-OID that show a penalty for early withdrawal of savings. These penalties are usually incurred when you withdraw money from a certificate of deposit or a time-deposit account before it matures.
Alimony paid
If you made payments for your spouse or former spouse for a divorce or separation you it may qualify as an alimony payment. Alimony is deductible by the payer spouse and is reported as income by the recipient. See Tax Topic: 542 - Alimony for more information.
IRA deduction
Enter any Traditional IRA contributions that are tax deductible. Traditional IRA contributions are normally tax deductible. However, if you have an employer-sponsored retirement plan, such as a 401(k), your tax deduction may be limited.
2017 Traditional IRA Deduction Phaseout Ranges
Tax Filing StatusIncome Phaseout Range
Married filing jointly$99,000 - $119,000
Single or Head of Household$62,000 - $72,000
Married filing separately$0 - $10,000
Please note that if your spouse has an employer-sponsored retirement plan but you do not, your tax deduction is phased out between incomes of $186,000 to $196,000. In addition, if you are married filing separately and have an employer-sponsored retirement plan, your tax deduction is phased out between incomes of $0 to $10,000.
Student loan interest deduction
Enter the total student loan interest you (and your spouse if married filing jointly) paid for the year. Your allowable deduction is phased-out starting at $80,000 ($165,000 married filing jointly) and is completely eliminated at $95,000 ($195,000 married filing jointly). The calculator will automatically determine any phaseout amounts based on your income.
Domestic production activities deduction (form 8903)
This is a deduction for businesses that produce goods in the United States. The complex provision provides up to a 9% deduction for net income from qualified domestic production activities, subject to limitations on wages paid. For S Corporations and Partnerships the amount for this deduction is usually reported on your K-1.
Total adjustments
Total of all of your adjustments. This is sometime referred to as "above the line" deductions since they do not require filing Schedule A for itemized deductions. Total income minus your total adjustments equals your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI).
Adjusted gross income
Adjusted gross income (AGI) is calculated by subtracting all deductions from the 'Adjusted Gross Income' section from your total income. AGI is used to calculate many of the qualifying amounts if you itemized your deductions.
Standard deduction
Your standard deduction is used to reduce your taxable income if you do not use Schedule A to itemize your deductions, or if your Schedule A itemized deduction is less than your standard deduction. Your standard deduction is based on your filing status. For 2017, the standard deductions are: **STANDARDDEDUCTION_TAXYEAR_DEFINITION**
Medical and dental expenses
Enter your qualified medical and dental expenses for the year. This can include your health insurance premiums if you paid for them yourself (not through an employer sponsored plan) and you have not deducted them elsewhere. Your actual deduction is only for the amount that exceeds 7.5% of your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). Enter your total expenses and we will calculate the actual deduction based on your AGI.
Taxes paid (generally state and local)
Enter the total of your 1) state and local property taxes and 2) state and local income taxes. If your state does not have an income tax (or you have paid more sales tax than income tax during the year) you can choose to include state local sales taxes instead of state and local income taxes.
Interest paid
Enter the total interest paid for a home mortgage and certain investment interest. Mortgage interest is report on form 1098. You can also include them amount you paid for 'points' (which reduces your mortgage interest rate) and any mortgage insurance premiums paid for mortgages issued after December 31st, 2006 (also reported on form 1098). You should also include any interest allocated to money you borrowed for investment purposes (form 4952).
Gifts to charity
Enter your total gifts of cash and non-cash to qualified charitable organizations.
Casualty and theft losses
Enter your total unreimbursed loss from theft, vandalism, fire, storms, corrosive drywall, etc. Your total allowed loss is reduced by $100 for each loss incident. Your actual deduction is only for the amount that exceeds 10% of your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). Enter the total loss that qualifies and we will calculate the actual deduction based on your AGI.
Job and misc. expenses
Enter the total of unreimbursed employee expenses (from see Publication 52 for details), tax preparation expense and certain other expenses (see Schedule A instructions). Your actual deduction is only for the amount that exceeds 2% of your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). Enter the total expense amount and we will calculate the actual deduction based on your AGI.
Other itemized expenses
Other itemized deductions (see Schedule A 'Other Miscellaneous Deductions' for complete list and description). This includes gambling losses (only to the extent that they offset current year winnings) and casualty losses from income producing property.
Itemized deduction
Your total itemized deductions from Schedule A before applying the Pease limitation. The Pease limitation reduces your itemized deductions by $3 for every $100 that your AGI is over an income threshold. The limitation can reduce your allowable itemized deductions by no more than 80%.
Income Limitation for Itemized Deduction
Filing StatusLimitation begins at an AGI of:
Married Filing Jointly$313,800
Qualified Widow(er)$313,800
Single$261,500
Heads of Household$287,650
Married Filing Separately$156,900
Deduction for exemptions
For each exemption you claim in 2017 you get a $4,050 reduction in taxable income. You can get an exemption for yourself and an exemption for your spouse (if you are married filing jointly) as long as you (or your spouse) can't be claimed as a dependent on someone else's taxes. You also get an exemption for each dependent you claim in 2017. For example, if you are married filing jointly with two dependent children, your total exemptions would be $4,050 X 4. However, the Personal Exemption Phase (PEP) out can reduce this amount for high earners. The PEP reduces your total exemption by 2% for every $2500 ($1250 if married filing separately) of additional Adjusted Gross Income (AGI).
Personal Exemption Phaseout for 2017
Filing StatusPEP Phaseout ThresholdPEP Phaseout Ends
Married Filing Jointly$313,800$436,300
Qualified Widow(er)$313,800$436,300
Single$261,500$384,000
Heads of Household$287,650$410,150
Married Filing Separately$156,900$218,150
Standard or itemized deduction
This is the higher of your Standard Deduction or your Itemized Deduction.
Taxable income
This is your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) minus deductions for exemptions minus your standard deduction or itemized deduction (whichever is larger).
Income tax
This is the total federal income tax you owe for 2017 before any tax credits, AMT or other non-income taxes.
Foreign tax credit (form 1116)
Any foreign tax credit per form 1116.
Credit for child and dependent care expenses (form 2441)
This is a credit for qualified child and dependent care. The credit is based on a percentage of actual amounts paid (or a maximum of $3,000 for one dependent or $6,000 for two or more dependents) which decreases as your income increases. If you or your spouse had an AGI of $43,000 or more in 2017 your credit would be 20% of your child and dependent care expenses with a maximum credit of $600 for one dependent and $1200 for two or more. See for 2441 for complete instructions.
Education credits (form 8863, line 23)
Enter any education credits you can claim from form 8863 line 23.
Retirement savings contributions credit (form 8880)
Enter any retirement savings contribution credit you can claim from form 8880.
Child tax credit
The child tax credit for 2017 is $1,000 for each qualifying dependent under age 17. This credit has a phaseout for 2017 of $55,000 for married couples filing separately, $75,000 for singles or head of household or qualifying widow(er)s and $110,000 for married couples filing jointly. For each $1,000 (or fraction of $1,000) your AGI is over the phaseout limit you lose $50 of your child tax credit. The credit on this line is non-refundable and can't reduce your income taxes below $0. The refundable child tax credit (which you can receive even if you do not have any taxable income), can be in the tax payments and refundable credits section.
Residential energy credits (Form 5695)
This is a credit for residential installation of qualified energy saving or producing equipment. This includes qualified solar electric generating equipment, solar water heating equipment (other than for hot tubs and pools), geothermal heat pumps, wind energy generators or fuel cell power plants. The credit is 30 percent of qualifying expenses. This credit was renewed in 2017 through 2021. See form 5695 for more information.
American opportunity credit (Form 8863, line 14)
Enter the total American opportunity credit that you are able to claim from form 8863 line 14.
American opportunity credit non-refundable
Any non-refundable portion of an American opportunity credit that you are able to claim.
Other credits that are not refundable
Enter any other tax credits you can claim. Tax credits entered here will not reduce your tax liability below zero (these are non-refundable credits).
Alternative minimum tax (AMT) income adjustments
Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) income adjustments will be added to your Alternative Minimum Tax Income (AMTI) when calculating AMT. Please do not include any itemized deductions or taxable refunds for state and local taxes, they are handled separately. Income adjustments to include would be additional items on form 6251 lines 7 through 21. This includes a multitude of adjustments such as income for depletion, net operating losses, exercise of incentive stock options, estates and trusts, disposition of property, loss limitations and other differences between AMT income and regular tax income. Enter your total (either actual or estimated) amount here. It is beyond the scope of this calculator to determine all of the individual AMT income adjustments.
Alternative minimum tax
Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) is calculated as follows (please see form 6251 Alternative Minimum Tax - Individuals):
  1. Start with your Adjusted Gross Income and subtract allowable itemized deductions. Allowable itemized deductions include Medical expenses above 10% of your AGI, Mortgage interest paid (with limits on equity lines of credit not used for home improvements), gifts to charity and casualty / theft loss. The allowed itemized deductions are not subject to the Pease income phaseout.
  2. Subtract any taxable refunds or credits of state and local taxes (line 21 of your 1040).
  3. Add income adjustments per form 6251 lines 7 through 21. This includes a multitude of adjustments such as income for depletion, net operating losses, exercise of incentive stock options, estates and trusts, disposition of property, loss limitations and other differences between AMT income and regular tax income. It is beyond the scope of this calculator to determine all of the AMT income adjustments. Enter your total (either actual or estimated) amount into the entry for "Other alternative minimum tax income adjustments".
  4. Subtract your AMT exemption amount, based on your filing status and the AMT Modified AGI to get your AMT Income (AMTI). Your exemption amount is decrease by 25% of any AMTI over the exemption phaseout threshold.
    Alternative Minimum Tax Exemption Amount by Filing Status 2017
    Filing StatusExemption AmountExemption Phaseout Threshold
    Married Filing Jointly$84,500$160,900
    Qualified Widow(er)$84,500$160,900
    Single$54,300$120,700
    Heads of Household$54,300$120,700
    Married Filing Separately$42,250$80,450
  5. Your AMT tax is calculated as 26% of AMTI up to $187,800 ($93,900 for married couples filing separately) plus 28% of all AMTI over $187,800 ($93,900 for married couples filing separately).
  6. If the AMT tax calculation results in an amount that is greater than your normal income tax, you owe the difference as AMT.
Excess advance premium tax credit repayment (form 8962)
This is the difference between the health insurance premium credit you received, and the actual credit you qualify to receive (based on your income, dependents and location). See form 8962 for detailed instructions. You should complete Form 8962 only for health insurance coverage a qualified health plan purchased through a Marketplace.
Self-employment tax
Self-employment tax (schedule SE) is calculated by taking your total 'net farm income or loss' and 'net business income or loss' and multiplying it by 92.35% (this is done to adjust your net income downward by the total employment tax that would have been paid by an employer, had you not been self-employed). If the result is less than $400.00, you do not owe any self-employment tax on this income.

If the result is greater than $400 you owe self-employment taxes. In 2017, income up to $127,200 is subject to the 12.4% tax paid for the Social Security portion of self-employment taxes (FICA). All self-employment income is subject to the Medicare tax of 2.9%.

If you were also an employee during the year, your employee counts toward the $127,200 threshold where the Social Security tax ends. If your total employee wages exceed $127,200 in 2017 you will not owe additional Social Security taxes for self-employment. You will, however, still owe the Medicare 2.9% tax.

Unreported Social Security and Medicare tax (form 4137)
Enter any Social Security and Medicare tax you owe from unreported tip income. See form 4137 for more information.
Additional tax on IRAs and other retirement plans (Form 5329)
If you made withdrawals from any IRA, qualified retirement plan or other tax-advantaged account and owe a 10% early withdrawal penalty (or other penalty) enter the penalty amount here. Please see form 5329 Additional Taxes on Qualified Plans (Including IRAs) and Other Tax-Favored Accounts.
Household employment taxes (Schedule H), Advanced EIC (W-2 box 9)
Enter any advanced Earned Income Credit you received as reported on your W-2 forms, line 9. Also enter any household employment taxes you owe (use Schedule H to determine this tax amount).
First time homebuyer credit repayment (Form 5405)
If you received a first time homebuyer credit and sold your home, you may have to repay part of the original credit. Please see form 5404 for more information.
Health care: individual responsibility
If you did not have health insurance for all of 2017 you may owe a Shared Responsibility Payment. Please see Health Coverage Exemptions (and instructions for figuring your shared responsibility payment) form 8965 for information on this tax.
Medicare tax sur-tax on earned income (Form 8959)
Income, such as wages and self-employment earnings, that were subject to Medicare taxes have sur-tax of 0.9% for amounts exceeding $200,000 ($250,000 if married filing jointly). This is automatically calculated based on all income entered as wages, salaries, tips, etc., all income entered as Business income or loss (Schedule C & E subject to self-employment taxes) and Farm income (Schedule F).
Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT) (Form 8960)
Investment income is subject to the Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT) when you have net positive investment income. Net investment income is total of all investment income, subject to the tax, where losses can offset gains in any given year. Any business income or loss that is subject to Self-Employment taxes is never considered investment income neither is business income from organizations where you actively participate (such as many S Corporations and Partnerships). The tax is 3.8% for all amounts above income thresholds for your filing type.
Income Threshold for NIIT
Filing StatusNIIT tax Threshold
Married Filing Jointly$250,000
Qualified Widow(er) with dependent child$250,000
Single$200,000
Heads of Household$200,000
Married Filing Separately$125,000
Total credits
Your total tax credits. This amount is subtracted from the total tax amount.
Total payments
Total of all tax payments made in 2017. This includes tax withheld from Forms W-2 and 1099, and estimated taxes paid, earned income credit and excess Social Security tax withheld.